Newcomer Support Team (NeST) Update for Dec 2017

The refugee family we are sponsoring has now experienced a taste of Canadian winter! Walking on ice is taking some adjustment but they remain positive and open to new experiences. They really enjoyed attending their first live hockey game as part of a birthday celebration last month. We hope to plan skating, tobogganing and cross-country skiing outings with them once winter returns. Both adults continue to dedicate themselves to their full time English studies which are going very well. On his own initiative, last month Khalil started part-time weekend work at a restaurant.

There are some significant expenses on the horizon for the New Year, most notably urgent dental work for which we’ve been told there is no IRCC health plan funding. This has been a common experience for many Syrian refugees and their sponsors. Your ongoing donations to help cover such extraordinary costs are appreciated.

NeST is always happy to welcome new team members, and the family is open and eager to make social connections to practice their English and build vocabulary. Contact Barb Driftmier if you’d like to be a part of the adventure either as a team member or making a more casual connection with the family.

This Week: “There Is No Christmas Story” [December 17th, 2017]

Most people are now aware that there is no Christmas story. You knew this, right? There are only fragments drawn from various prophecies in the Hebrew scriptures, and unconnected stories pieced together from the gospels.

Those Hebrew prophecies were not actually referring to the birth of Jesus, and those gospel fragments contain details that differ wildly from each other. Not only that, but the earliest Christian witnesses-the apostle Paul and the author of the Gospel according to Mark-those closest to the time of Jesus’ birth-say nothing about it at all. So either they knew nothing about it, or they didn’t consider what they knew worth sharing.

But stitched together, these fragments create a grand myth we call the Christmas Story. Despite the unlikelihood that any of it actually happened, this story contains a deep and abiding truth, the hope of Christians throughout the ages: that God is born into our midst, and not as a powerful warlord; rather, as a defenseless baby.

Yet this changes everything, even the world itself. For this baby toppled the Roman Empire and, to this day, strikes fear in the hearts of despots and tyrants. We know that God resides in the corners of our own lives, requiring both our tender care of this divine presence, and also our strong reliance upon it in times of need.

Calgary Renaissance Singers & Players – Exultate! Rejoice!

Come and help us celebrate the light that shines in the darkness! Katie Partridge is a member of Luminous Voices and an early-music specialist. With this concert, she steps into the spotlight as a concert soloist, bringing to life the music of Hildegard von Bingen.and Monteverdi’s Laudate Dominum, perfect music for the beautiful sanctuary acoustic of St. Stephen’s Anglican Church. Accompaning by the brilliant Calgary organist Chellan Hoffman, and John van Leeuwen performing on Baroque oboe d’amore.

The Players, our core of early-music instrumentalists, will also be featured brightly in this concert. St. Stephen’s will ring with the sounds of recorders, shawms, harpsichord, bells, drums, and viol, enticing some Renaissance dancers to kick up their heels for a joyful moment or two

This Week: “Communities Of Care” [December 10th, 2017]”

Parish churches are microcosms of care. And mid-sized midtown congregations, like St. Stephen’s, are particularly well suited to this calling. Like villages scattered throughout the urban landscape, it is here that we become known, that we have a sense of belonging, that we learn to welcome into our hearts our neighbours, learning to love as we ourselves are loved.

This capacity of Christian congregations to become communities of care is especially critical when church members face hard times brought on by physical or mental illness, or by bereavement, or by financial disaster. It means no one has to face such challenges alone.

St. Paul wrote that, as Christians, we are all members of one body. When one member suffers, the whole body suffers; when one rejoices, the whole body rejoices. So as we get to know one another, and welcome each other into our hearts, we find quite naturally that we reach out to one another. We pray for each other, we check in with each other, we visit each other, whether in home or in hospital. We extend our best wishes by sending flowers, or providing casseroles.

The city can sometimes seem like one big anonymous machine, and social isolation is the result. But not at church. Look around you. These are your brothers and sisters. When they hurt, you hurt; when they laugh, you laugh. It is here that we learn how to love the world, by loving one another. This is God’s gift, and our greatest calling

Do You Hear What I Hear?: a night of hearing the Christmas story in a brand new way with good people and good music

If you’ve wondered what the Christmas story about baby Jesus is really about and if it has anything meaningful to say to us today, join local minister Nick Coates and local musician Jesse Peters for “Do You Hear What I Hear?: a night of hearing the Christmas story in a brand new way with good people and good music.”

Everyone is welcome, wanted and accepted to come out to this. Bring a food bank donation or pay what you can to help cover the costs.